The world of yesterday, today and tomorrow

Eighty-two years ago this month, The New York Times published an article commenting upon the 20-year “Grand Canyon of History” separating the leaders of 1914 from the then-contemporary leaders of 1934. The general question was how leaders of one era differ from those of another. That interesting exercise gave rise in my mind to a two-part variation: How did the leaders of 20 years ago differ from those of today, and how will the leaders of two decades from now be different from those who lead today? 

How different was 1996?

Entering the Wayback Machine (also known as the WABAC Machine. If you’re under 40, you may need a Wayback Machine of your own to understand the reference, from The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show. A serviceable substitute is YouTube.), we see that in 1996 we are just entering the internet era. The global population is around 5.7 billion people. Only 45 million of them are using the internet, with roughly “30 million of those in North America (United States and Canada), 9 million in Europe, and 6 million in Asia/Pacific (Australia, Japan, etc.). 43.2 million (44%) of US households own a personal computer, and 14 million of them are online.”

It’s very different age technologicallyEarly in the year, Motorola introduces the Motorola StarTAC Wearable Cellular Telephone, the world’s smallest and lightest mobile phone to date. Chess computer Deep Blue defeats world chess champion Garry Kasparov for the first time. Pokémon Red and Blue are released in Japan by Nintendo. At the end of the year, Steve Jobs’ company NeXT is purchased by Apple Computer. 

Most people in 1996 don’t realize it, but the trends that will dominate two decades hence (such as mobile, machine learning/A.I., gamification and consumerization) are just kicking off. 

Source Article from http://www.computerworld.com/article/3110630/it-management/the-world-of-yesterday-today-and-tomorrow.html

The CIO is becoming the HVAC guy

A group of CXOs and I were thinking about the future recently and started pondering this question: What will the role of the CIO be in 2030? To answer this question, we have to make some forecasts regarding what the social, political, economic and technological environment will look like. 

What people are saying about 2030

Do a search of the term “2030” and the results will span a spectrum of macro and micro issues (the x-axis) and attitudes (the y-axis), ranging from utopian to dystopian. They all will tend to reflect the current concerns and agendas of insulated and isolated elites. 

Spending a day or so online on the macro level, you might learn about the evolving state of global trade, the pace of the move toward global gender equality and the chance that Earth could be struck by an asteroid within the next 14 years. One concludes that, barring wide-scale behavior change, there will be no shortage of shortages: food, water, energy and housing. 

Spending a similar amount of time online on the micro level, you might learn how crowded London will become and the rising price of homes there, the losing battle to reduce male obesity, the evolution of global personal sanitary habits and the changing nature of the morning commute.  

Source Article from http://www.computerworld.com/article/3096771/it-management/the-cio-is-becoming-the-hvac-guy.html

IT leaders: Don’t fear the future

For longtime Computerworld columnist Thornton May, the inevitability of technical progression means that a key skill for IT leaders is to anticipate what’s coming and determine what will be worth incorporating into the business and what will be little more than a fad, with no potential for adding value to the enterprise.

To read some of May’s predictions for what to keep on your radar going forward, download the Knowledge Pack below.

Source Article from http://www.computerworld.com/article/3081258/it-management/it-leaders-dont-fear-the-future.html

IT leaders: Don’t fear the future

For longtime Computerworld columnist Thornton May, the inevitability of technical progression means that a key skill for IT leaders is to anticipate what’s coming and determine what will be worth incorporating into the business and what will be little more than a fad, with no potential for adding value to the enterprise.

To read some of May’s predictions for what to keep on your radar going forward, download the Knowledge Pack below.

Source Article from http://www.computerworld.com/article/3081258/it-management/it-leaders-dont-fear-the-future.html

IT leaders: Don’t fear the future

For longtime Computerworld columnist Thornton May, the inevitability of technical progression means that a key skill for IT leaders is to anticipate what’s coming and determine what will be worth incorporating into the business and what will be little more than a fad, with no potential for adding value to the enterprise.

To read some of May’s predictions for what to keep on your radar going forward, download the Knowledge Pack below.

Source Article from http://www.computerworld.com/article/3081258/it-management/it-leaders-dont-fear-the-future.html

IT leaders: Don’t fear the future

For longtime Computerworld columnist Thornton May, the inevitability of technical progression means that a key skill for IT leaders is to anticipate what’s coming and determine what will be worth incorporating into the business and what will be little more than a fad, with no potential for adding value to the enterprise.

To read some of May’s predictions for what to keep on your radar going forward, download the Knowledge Pack below.

Source Article from http://www.computerworld.com/article/3081258/it-management/it-leaders-dont-fear-the-future.html

IT leaders: Don’t fear the future

For longtime Computerworld columnist Thornton May, the inevitability of technical progression means that a key skill for IT leaders is to anticipate what’s coming and determine what will be worth incorporating into the business and what will be little more than a fad, with no potential for adding value to the enterprise.

To read some of May’s predictions for what to keep on your radar going forward, download the Knowledge Pack below.

Source Article from http://www.computerworld.com/article/3081258/it-management/it-leaders-dont-fear-the-future.html

IT leaders: Don’t fear the future

For longtime Computerworld columnist Thornton May, the inevitability of technical progression means that a key skill for IT leaders is to anticipate what’s coming and determine what will be worth incorporating into the business and what will be little more than a fad, with no potential for adding value to the enterprise.

To read some of May’s predictions for what to keep on your radar going forward, download the Knowledge Pack below.

Source Article from http://www.computerworld.com/article/3081258/it-management/it-leaders-dont-fear-the-future.html

IT leaders: Don’t fear the future

For longtime Computerworld columnist Thornton May, the inevitability of technical progression means that a key skill for IT leaders is to anticipate what’s coming and determine what will be worth incorporating into the business and what will be little more than a fad, with no potential for adding value to the enterprise.

To read some of May’s predictions for what to keep on your radar going forward, download the Knowledge Pack below.

Source Article from http://www.computerworld.com/article/3081258/it-management/it-leaders-dont-fear-the-future.html

IT leaders: Don’t fear the future

For longtime Computerworld columnist Thornton May, the inevitability of technical progression means that a key skill for IT leaders is to anticipate what’s coming and determine what will be worth incorporating into the business and what will be little more than a fad, with no potential for adding value to the enterprise.

To read some of May’s predictions for what to keep on your radar going forward, download the Knowledge Pack below.

Source Article from http://www.computerworld.com/article/3081258/it-management/it-leaders-dont-fear-the-future.html